Like the other countries from the Balkans, Bulgaria's population is very conservative when it comes to issues like sexuality. Although homosexuality was decriminalized in 1968, people with different sexual orientations and identities are still not well accepted in society. In 2003 the country enacted several laws protecting the LGBT community and individuals from discrimination. In 2008, Bulgaria organized its first ever pride parade. The almost 200 people who had gathered were attacked by skinheads, but police managed to prevent any injuries. The 2009 pride parade, with the motto "Rainbow Friendship" attracted more than 300 participants from Bulgaria and tourists from Greece and Great Britain. There were no disruptions and the parade continued as planned. A third Pride parade took place successfully in 2010, with close to 800 participants and an outdoor concert event.
The first marches were both serious and fun, and served to inspire the widening activist movement; they were repeated in the following years, and more and more annual marches started up in other cities throughout the world. In Atlanta and New York City the marches were called Gay Liberation Marches, and the day of celebration was called "Gay Liberation Day"; in Los Angeles and San Francisco they became known as 'Gay Freedom Marches' and the day was called "Gay Freedom Day". As more cities and even smaller towns began holding their own celebrations, these names spread. The rooted ideology behind the parades is a critique of space which has been produced to seem heteronormative and 'straight', and therefore any act appearing to be homosexual is considered dissident by society. The Parade brings this homosexual behaviour into the space.
On August 3, 2012 the first LGBT Viet Pride event was held in Hanoi, Vietnam with indoor activities such as film screenings, research presentations, and a bicycle rally on August 5, 2012 that attracted almost 200 people riding to support the LGBT cause. Viet Pride has since expanded, now taking place in 17 cities and provinces in Vietnam in the first weekend of August, attracting around 700 bikers in 2014 in Hanoi, and was reported on many mainstream media channels.[69]
Brenda Howard, a bisexual activist, is known as the "Mother of Pride" for her work in coordinating the march, and she also originated the idea for a week-long series of events around Pride Day which became the genesis of the annual LGBT Pride celebrations that are now held around the world every June.[22][23] Additionally, Howard along with the bisexual activist Robert A. Martin (aka Donny the Punk) and gay activist L. Craig Schoonmaker are credited with popularizing the word "Pride" to describe these festivities.[24][25][26] Bisexual activist Tom Limoncelli later stated, "The next time someone asks you why LGBT Pride marches exist or why [LGBT] Pride Month is June tell them 'A bisexual woman named Brenda Howard thought it should be.'"[27][28]
Similar to Kameny's regret at his own reaction to the shift in attitudes after the riots, Randy Wicker came to describe his embarrassment as "one of the greatest mistakes of his life".[40] The image of gays retaliating against police, after so many years of allowing such treatment to go unchallenged, "stirred an unexpected spirit among many homosexuals".[40] Kay Lahusen, who photographed the marches in 1965, stated, "Up to 1969, this movement was generally called the homosexual or homophile movement.... Many new activists consider the Stonewall uprising the birth of the gay liberation movement. Certainly it was the birth of gay pride on a massive scale."[41]
2019 will be extra special because New York will be hosting the iconic World Pride for the entire month of June. This will be the first time in World Pride's 20-year history that the event will take place in the USA. Pride means different things to everyone, which is why World Pride NYC offers a whole heap of LGBTQ activities during the celebrations.  
The first public demonstration by gay people in Italy took place in San Remo on April 5, 1972, and was in protest against the International Congress on Sexual Deviance organized by the Catholic-inspired Italian Center of Sexology. The event was attended by about forty people belonging to various homophile groups, including ones from France, Belgium, Great Britain's Gay Liberation Front, and Italy's activist homosexual rights group Fuori! [it].[84]:54–59
In a 2008 interview for the biography book La Reina muy cerca (The Queen Up Close) by Spanish journalist and writer Pilar Urbano, Queen Sofía of Spain sparked off controversy by voicing her disapproval of LGBT pride in addition to overstepping her official duties as a member of the Royal Family by censuring the Spanish Law on Marriage in how it names equal same-sex unions "matrimonio" (marriage). Albeit without using the slogan "Straight Pride", Queen Sofía was directly quoted as saying that if heterosexuals were to take the streets as the LGBT community does for Gay Pride parades, that the former collective would bring Madrid to a standstill.[56]
Pride Month is a time when the LGBT community is front and center and celebrated, and that can be so important for young people everywhere. Whether it's a rainbow flag at their favorite restaurant, a couple holding hands at a pride parade, or news coverage of pride on TV, the month really shows young people how many LGBT people and allies are in our communities.
The Hong Kong Pride Parade 2008 boosted the rally count above 1,000 in the second largest East Asian Pride after Taipei’s. By now a firmly annual event, Pride 2013 saw more than 5,200 participants. The city continues to hold the event every year, except in 2010 when it was not held due to a budget shortfall.[48][49][50][51][52][53][54][excessive citations][non-primary source needed]
Christopher Street Liberation Day on June 28, 1970 marked the first anniversary of the Stonewall riots with the march, which was the first Gay Pride march in U.S. history, and covered the 51 blocks to Central Park. The march took less than half the scheduled time due to excitement, but also due to wariness about walking through the city with gay banners and signs. Although the parade permit was delivered only two hours before the start of the march, the marchers encountered little resistance from onlookers.[30] The New York Times reported (on the front page) that the marchers took up the entire street for about 15 city blocks.[29] Reporting by The Village Voice was positive, describing "the out-front resistance that grew out of the police raid on the Stonewall Inn one year ago".[31] There was also an assembly on Christopher Street.
In 1995 MCC, ProGay Philippines and other organizations held internal celebrations. In 1996, 1997 and 1998 large and significant marches were organized and produced by Reachout AIDS Foundation, all of which were held in Malate, Manila, Philippines. In 1998, the year of the centennial commemoration of the Republic of the Philippines, a Gay and Lesbian Pride March was incorporated in the mammoth "citizens' parade" which was part of the official centennial celebration. That parade culminated in "marching by" the President of the Philippines, His Excellency Joseph Estrada, at the Quirino Grandstand in Luneta Park in Manila.
A number of associations and social movements have been denouncing in recent years which, in its views, is a depletion of the claims of these demonstrations and the merchandization of the parade. In this respect, they defend, in countries like Spain, the United States or Canada, a Critical Pride celebration to have a political meaning again.[63][64][65][66] Gay Shame, a radical movement within the LGBT community, opposes the assimilation of LGBT people into mainstream, heteronormative society, the commodification of non-heterosexual identity and culture, and in particular the (over) commercialization of pride events.[citation needed]
Even the most festive parades usually offer some aspect dedicated to remembering victims of AIDS and anti-LGBT violence. Some particularly important pride parades are funded by governments and corporate sponsors and promoted as major tourist attractions for the cities that host them. In some countries, some pride parades are now also called Pride Festivals. Some of these festivals provide a carnival-like atmosphere in a nearby park or city-provided closed-off street, with information booths, music concerts, barbecues, beer stands, contests, sports, and games. The 'dividing line' between onlookers and those marching in the parade can be hard to establish in some events, however, in cases where the event is received with hostility, such a separation becomes very obvious. There have been studies considering how the relationship between participants and onlookers is affected by the divide, and how space is used to critique the heteronormative nature of society.
For 2019, Pride Island will occupy Pier 97, in the heart of Hell's Kitchen, and as per usual you can expect top-notch performers. While the line-up is yet to be confirmed, Pride Island has a history of attracting the biggest performers of any pride in the world. Last year, Pride Island welcomed Aussie pop princess, Kylie Minogue, while previous years have seen Ariana Grande, Cher, and the late Whitney Houston take to the stage.     
A Brazilian photographer was arrested after refusing to delete photos of police attacking two young people participating in a gay pride parade on October 16, 2011 in the city of Itabuna, Bahia, reported the newspaper Correio 24 horas. According to the website Notícias de Ipiau, Ederivaldo Benedito, known as Bené, said four police officers tried to convince him to delete the photos soon after they realized they were being photographed. When he refused, they ordered him to turn over the camera. When the photographer refused again, the police charged him with contempt and held him in jail for over 21 hours until he gave a statement. According to Chief Marlon Macedo, the police alleged that the photographer was interfering with their work, did not have identification, and became aggressive when he was asked to move. Bené denied the allegations, saying the police were belligerent and that the scene was witnessed by "over 300 people", reported Agência Estado.[55]
Pride Month is a time when the LGBT community is front and center and celebrated, and that can be so important for young people everywhere. Whether it's a rainbow flag at their favorite restaurant, a couple holding hands at a pride parade, or news coverage of pride on TV, the month really shows young people how many LGBT people and allies are in our communities.

On Saturday, June 27, 1970, Chicago Gay Liberation organized a march[12] from Washington Square Park ("Bughouse Square") to the Water Tower at the intersection of Michigan and Chicago avenues, which was the route originally planned, and then many of the participants spontaneously marched on to the Civic Center (now Richard J. Daley) Plaza.[13] The date was chosen because the Stonewall events began on the last Saturday of June and because organizers wanted to reach the maximum number of Michigan Avenue shoppers. Subsequent Chicago parades have been held on the last Sunday of June, coinciding with the date of many similar parades elsewhere.
The State of New York is preparing to host in 2019 the largest international LGBT pride celebration in history, known as Stonewall 50 – WorldPride NYC 2019,[5] to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall Riots; as many as 4 million people are expected to attend in Manhattan alone.[6] In New York City, the Stonewall 50 - WorldPride NYC 2019 events produced by Heritage of Pride will be enhanced through a partnership made with the I ❤ NY program's LGBT division and shall include a welcome center during the weeks surrounding the Stonewall 50 / WorldPride events that will be open to all. Additional commemorative arts, cultural, and educational programming to mark the 50th anniversary of the rebellion at the Stonewall Inn will be taking place throughout the city and the world.[7]
The Amsterdam, in the Netherlands, Gay Pride has been held since 1996 and can be seen as one of the most successful in acquiring social acceptance. The week(end)-long event involves concerts, sports tournaments, street parties and most importantly the Canal Pride, a parade on boats on the canals of Amsterdam. In 2008 three government ministers joined on their own boat, representing the whole cabinet. Mayor of Amsterdam Job Cohen also joined. About 500,000 visitors were reported. 2008 was also the first year large Dutch international corporations ING Group and TNT NV sponsored the event.
The Leipzig CSD Pride 2019 festival is scheduled to take place from July 5th-13th, with the LGBTQ parade on Saturday. Organised by a group of individuals and representatives of various associations, institutions and projects, the one-week festival features many LGBTQ-related activities, discussions, events and parties across the city. Planning to ...read more
June is Pride Month, a month to celebrate gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, queer, and asexual people, plus all other sexual orientations and genders.  The month is celebrated in June in commemoration of the Stonewall Riots, which kicked off the first major demonstrations for gay rights in America. On June 28, 1969 police raided the Stonewall Inn in New York City’s Greenwich Village, but bar patrons — gay men and drag queens — fought back, a spontaneous incident which is now marked as the beginning of the gay rights movement in the United States. Brenda Howard, a bisexual activist, organized a march and other events to commemorate the one-year anniversary of the riots and is known as the “Mother of Pride.” Today, Pride Month features marches around the country, educational and awareness events, and parties to celebrate gay pride!
On Sunday, June 28, 1970, at around noon, in New York gay activist groups held their own pride parade, known as the Christopher Street Liberation Day, to recall the events of Stonewall one year earlier. On November 2, 1969, Craig Rodwell, his partner Fred Sargeant, Ellen Broidy, and Linda Rhodes proposed the first gay pride parade to be held in New York City by way of a resolution at the Eastern Regional Conference of Homophile Organizations (ERCHO) meeting in Philadelphia.[20]
The first marches were both serious and fun, and served to inspire the widening activist movement; they were repeated in the following years, and more and more annual marches started up in other cities throughout the world. In Atlanta and New York City the marches were called Gay Liberation Marches, and the day of celebration was called "Gay Liberation Day"; in Los Angeles and San Francisco they became known as 'Gay Freedom Marches' and the day was called "Gay Freedom Day". As more cities and even smaller towns began holding their own celebrations, these names spread. The rooted ideology behind the parades is a critique of space which has been produced to seem heteronormative and 'straight', and therefore any act appearing to be homosexual is considered dissident by society. The Parade brings this homosexual behaviour into the space.
To Believe in Women, by Lillian Faderman, is a landmark book about lesbian history in the late nineteenth and twentieth century.  Unfortunately it is no longer available from our distributors, but it is offered through Amazon. To address the issue of the invisibility of lesbians in history books, we quote an excerpt from Living with History/Making Social Change, by Gerda Lerner, historian, author, and pioneer in the field of women’s history: “Researchers in women’s history often have to depend on autobiographical writing – diaries, letters, memoirs, and fiction – to piece together the life stories of women of the past. . . Self-descriptive narratives of women abound in omission and disguises. . . .A subset of autobiographies and biographies concerns women who had special friendships with other women prior to the period when lesbian relationships were defined.  Carroll Smith-Rosenberg’s essay, “The Female World of Love and Ritual: Relations between Women in Nineteenth Century America,” had long defined the discourse and also limited it (footnote omitted). Smith-Rosenberg had argued that single- sex friendships among women were accepted by society in the nineteenth century and were not considered marks of deviance.  Were modern historians justified in defining such friendships as lesbian relationships?  Were they reading modern interpretations into the past record?  The subject was mostly discussed and written about by lesbian historians, while heterosexual historians, coming upon ample evidence of such special friendships, gingerly danced around them.  Among the many prominent nineteenth-women who had lifelong stable relationships with other women, which involved shared home-making, shared finances, and often shared organizational responsibilities, were Jane Addams, Frances Willard, and M. Carey Thomas.  What kind of “evidence” did one need to define the relationship as lesbian?  Were such relationships lesbian if one could not prove sexual aspects?  Heterosexual authors often chose to ignore such relationships or to refer to them simply as “friendships,” allowing the reader to draw her/his own conclusions. I urged historians to report honestly on what their sources told them about these relationships, without necessarily being able to report on how the participants or their contemporaries defined such relationships.” From Living with History/Making Social Change, by Gerda Lerner (2009) 

The event has been commemorated by annual celebrations in New York and Los Angeles in June, a tradition starting with marches on June 28,1970 marking the anniversary of the Stonewall Rebellion. The Stonewall Inn was declared a national historical landmark in March 2000, cited as the birthplace of the modern gay and lesbian civil rights movement. Now, Gay and Lesbian Pride events and parades are planned annually in the month of June all over the country as well as internationally.
Brenda Howard, a bisexual activist, is known as the "Mother of Pride" for her work in coordinating the march, and she also originated the idea for a week-long series of events around Pride Day which became the genesis of the annual LGBT Pride celebrations that are now held around the world every June.[22][23] Additionally, Howard along with the bisexual activist Robert A. Martin (aka Donny the Punk) and gay activist L. Craig Schoonmaker are credited with popularizing the word "Pride" to describe these festivities.[24][25][26] Bisexual activist Tom Limoncelli later stated, "The next time someone asks you why LGBT Pride marches exist or why [LGBT] Pride Month is June tell them 'A bisexual woman named Brenda Howard thought it should be.'"[27][28]
Social conservatives are sometimes opposed to such events because they view them to be contrary to public morality. This belief is partly based on certain things often found in the parades, such as public nudity, BDSM paraphernalia, and other sexualized features. Within the academic community, there has been criticism that the parades actually set to strengthen homosexual-heterosexual divides and increase essentialist views.
The White House is holding an LGBT Pride Month Champions of Change Video Challenge to explore the stories of unsung heroes and local leaders who are leading our march towards a more perfect union. In early June, you will have a chance to weigh in and help identify finalists that will be featured as Champions of Change at an event at the White House!
Toronto's pride parade has been held yearly since 1981. In 2003 its activists help score a major victory when the Ontario Court of Appeals upheld a lower court ruling which made same-sex marriage legal in Ontario, the first jurisdiction in North America to do so.[137] By this time the Toronto Pride Week Festival had been running for twenty-three years. It is also one of the largest, attracting around 1.3 million people in 2009.[138] The latest pride parade in Toronto was held on Sunday June 24, 2018. Toronto hosted WorldPride in 2014.
To Believe in Women, by Lillian Faderman, is a landmark book about lesbian history in the late nineteenth and twentieth century.  Unfortunately it is no longer available from our distributors, but it is offered through Amazon. To address the issue of the invisibility of lesbians in history books, we quote an excerpt from Living with History/Making Social Change, by Gerda Lerner, historian, author, and pioneer in the field of women’s history: “Researchers in women’s history often have to depend on autobiographical writing – diaries, letters, memoirs, and fiction – to piece together the life stories of women of the past. . . Self-descriptive narratives of women abound in omission and disguises. . . .A subset of autobiographies and biographies concerns women who had special friendships with other women prior to the period when lesbian relationships were defined.  Carroll Smith-Rosenberg’s essay, “The Female World of Love and Ritual: Relations between Women in Nineteenth Century America,” had long defined the discourse and also limited it (footnote omitted). Smith-Rosenberg had argued that single- sex friendships among women were accepted by society in the nineteenth century and were not considered marks of deviance.  Were modern historians justified in defining such friendships as lesbian relationships?  Were they reading modern interpretations into the past record?  The subject was mostly discussed and written about by lesbian historians, while heterosexual historians, coming upon ample evidence of such special friendships, gingerly danced around them.  Among the many prominent nineteenth-women who had lifelong stable relationships with other women, which involved shared home-making, shared finances, and often shared organizational responsibilities, were Jane Addams, Frances Willard, and M. Carey Thomas.  What kind of “evidence” did one need to define the relationship as lesbian?  Were such relationships lesbian if one could not prove sexual aspects?  Heterosexual authors often chose to ignore such relationships or to refer to them simply as “friendships,” allowing the reader to draw her/his own conclusions. I urged historians to report honestly on what their sources told them about these relationships, without necessarily being able to report on how the participants or their contemporaries defined such relationships.” From Living with History/Making Social Change, by Gerda Lerner (2009)
In Italy, it is celebrated in June, as a unique event together with Gay pride#LGBT Pride Month and is generally known as "Pride Month". This expression became popular in 2018 when the "Onda Pride"[19] celebrations ("pride wave", a following of pride parades all over Italy during 2015 in order to ask for Civil Union Law to be approved) established as a Calendar of parades to take place every year all over Italy. In Italy, Pride Month is usually connected to love festivals, weeks of events, meetings, celebrations, conventions and so on, all regarding LGBT+ rights, universal love and fight to discrimination. During this month, Italian companies and brands are used to personalize commercials, logos, and ad campaigns with rainbow colors and LGBT pro messages.[20] 

Taking place after the popular Midsummer celebrations, Helsinki Pride is the biggest cultural event in Finland celebrating human rights and diversity. The weeklong Helsinki Pride 2019 runs from June 24th-30th, with the main Pride parade on Saturday, plus various workshops, activities, shows and dance parties. Thinking of attending? Then please ...read more

A number of associations and social movements have been denouncing in recent years which, in its views, is a depletion of the claims of these demonstrations and the merchandization of the parade. In this respect, they defend, in countries like Spain, the United States or Canada, a Critical Pride celebration to have a political meaning again.[63][64][65][66] Gay Shame, a radical movement within the LGBT community, opposes the assimilation of LGBT people into mainstream, heteronormative society, the commodification of non-heterosexual identity and culture, and in particular the (over) commercialization of pride events.[citation needed]
The State of New York is preparing to host in 2019 the largest international LGBT pride celebration in history, known as Stonewall 50 – WorldPride NYC 2019,[5] to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall Riots; as many as 4 million people are expected to attend in Manhattan alone.[6] In New York City, the Stonewall 50 - WorldPride NYC 2019 events produced by Heritage of Pride will be enhanced through a partnership made with the I ❤ NY program's LGBT division and shall include a welcome center during the weeks surrounding the Stonewall 50 / WorldPride events that will be open to all. Additional commemorative arts, cultural, and educational programming to mark the 50th anniversary of the rebellion at the Stonewall Inn will be taking place throughout the city and the world.[7]
In 2007, following international pressure, a Pride Parade was held once again in Riga with 4,500 people parading around Vērmane Garden, protected physically from "No Pride" protesters by 1,500 Latvian police, with ringing the inside and the outside of the iron railings of the park. Two fire crackers were detonated with one being thrown from outside at the end of the festival as participants were moving off to the buses. A man and his son were afterwards arrested by the police.[86] This caused some alarm but no injury, although participants did have to run the gauntlet of "No Pride" abuse as they ran to the buses. They were driven to a railway station on the outskirts of Riga, from where they went to a post Pride "relax" at the seaside resort of Jūrmala. Participants included MEPs, Amnesty International observers and random individuals who travelled from abroad to support LGBT Latvians and their friends and families.
In 1995 MCC, ProGay Philippines and other organizations held internal celebrations. In 1996, 1997 and 1998 large and significant marches were organized and produced by Reachout AIDS Foundation, all of which were held in Malate, Manila, Philippines. In 1998, the year of the centennial commemoration of the Republic of the Philippines, a Gay and Lesbian Pride March was incorporated in the mammoth "citizens' parade" which was part of the official centennial celebration. That parade culminated in "marching by" the President of the Philippines, His Excellency Joseph Estrada, at the Quirino Grandstand in Luneta Park in Manila.
In 2007, following international pressure, a Pride Parade was held once again in Riga with 4,500 people parading around Vērmane Garden, protected physically from "No Pride" protesters by 1,500 Latvian police, with ringing the inside and the outside of the iron railings of the park. Two fire crackers were detonated with one being thrown from outside at the end of the festival as participants were moving off to the buses. A man and his son were afterwards arrested by the police.[86] This caused some alarm but no injury, although participants did have to run the gauntlet of "No Pride" abuse as they ran to the buses. They were driven to a railway station on the outskirts of Riga, from where they went to a post Pride "relax" at the seaside resort of Jūrmala. Participants included MEPs, Amnesty International observers and random individuals who travelled from abroad to support LGBT Latvians and their friends and families.
To Believe in Women, by Lillian Faderman, is a landmark book about lesbian history in the late nineteenth and twentieth century.  Unfortunately it is no longer available from our distributors, but it is offered through Amazon. To address the issue of the invisibility of lesbians in history books, we quote an excerpt from Living with History/Making Social Change, by Gerda Lerner, historian, author, and pioneer in the field of women’s history: “Researchers in women’s history often have to depend on autobiographical writing – diaries, letters, memoirs, and fiction – to piece together the life stories of women of the past. . . Self-descriptive narratives of women abound in omission and disguises. . . .A subset of autobiographies and biographies concerns women who had special friendships with other women prior to the period when lesbian relationships were defined.  Carroll Smith-Rosenberg’s essay, “The Female World of Love and Ritual: Relations between Women in Nineteenth Century America,” had long defined the discourse and also limited it (footnote omitted). Smith-Rosenberg had argued that single- sex friendships among women were accepted by society in the nineteenth century and were not considered marks of deviance.  Were modern historians justified in defining such friendships as lesbian relationships?  Were they reading modern interpretations into the past record?  The subject was mostly discussed and written about by lesbian historians, while heterosexual historians, coming upon ample evidence of such special friendships, gingerly danced around them.  Among the many prominent nineteenth-women who had lifelong stable relationships with other women, which involved shared home-making, shared finances, and often shared organizational responsibilities, were Jane Addams, Frances Willard, and M. Carey Thomas.  What kind of “evidence” did one need to define the relationship as lesbian?  Were such relationships lesbian if one could not prove sexual aspects?  Heterosexual authors often chose to ignore such relationships or to refer to them simply as “friendships,” allowing the reader to draw her/his own conclusions. I urged historians to report honestly on what their sources told them about these relationships, without necessarily being able to report on how the participants or their contemporaries defined such relationships.” From Living with History/Making Social Change, by Gerda Lerner (2009)

The rainbow flag is also known as the pride flag, and June is a great time to wave it! The original gay pride flag was designed by activist Gilbert Baker after fellow activist Harvey Milk challenged him to design a symbol of pride for the gay community prior to the Gay Freedom Day Parade on June 25, 1978. Today the flag is widely recognized as a symbol for LGBT pride. So whether you hang a flag outside your house or put on a rainbow tee, let your colors fly!


The first South African pride parade was held towards the end of the apartheid era in Johannesburg on October 13, 1990, the first such event on the African continent. Section Nine of the country's 1996 constitution provides for equality and freedom from discrimination on the grounds of sexual orientation among other factors.[40][41] The Joburg Pride organising body disbanded in 2013 due to internal conflict about whether the event should continue to be used for political advocacy. A new committee was formed in May 2013 to organise a "People's Pride", which was "envisioned as an inclusive and explicitly political movement for social justice".[42][43][44] Other pride parades held in the Johannesburg area include Soweto Pride which takes place annually in Meadowlands, Soweto, and eKurhuleni Pride which takes place annually in KwaThema, a township on the East Rand. Pride parades held in other South African cities include the Cape Town Pride parade and Khumbulani Pride in Cape Town, Durban Pride in Durban, and Nelson Mandela Bay Pride in Port Elizabeth. Limpopo Pride is held in Polokwane, Limpopo.
After 2008, the numbers grew rapidly. In 2009 around five thousand people participated in the gay parade under the slogan "Love out loud" (Chinese: 同志愛很大). In 2010, despite bad weather conditions the Taiwan gay parade "Out and Vote" attracted more than 30,000 people, making it the largest such event in Asia. In 2017, around 123,000 people participated in the gay parade.[citation needed]

Christopher Street Liberation Day on June 28, 1970 marked the first anniversary of the Stonewall riots with the march, which was the first Gay Pride march in U.S. history, and covered the 51 blocks to Central Park. The march took less than half the scheduled time due to excitement, but also due to wariness about walking through the city with gay banners and signs. Although the parade permit was delivered only two hours before the start of the march, the marchers encountered little resistance from onlookers.[30] The New York Times reported (on the front page) that the marchers took up the entire street for about 15 city blocks.[29] Reporting by The Village Voice was positive, describing "the out-front resistance that grew out of the police raid on the Stonewall Inn one year ago".[31] There was also an assembly on Christopher Street.


The annual gay Pride weekend in Cologne takes place from July 5th-7th in 2019. with the street parade on Sunday. Hundreds of thousands of participants are expected. The street festival will feature numerous LGBT activities and events - colourful stage performances, parties, political events, film screenings, cultural activities, etc. Planning to be ...read more
October was chosen by Wilson as the month for the celebration because National Coming Out Day already was established as a widely known event, on October 11, the date of the Second March of Washington for Lesbian and Gay Rights., In 1987,[10] October also commemorated the first National March on Washington for Lesbian and Gay Rights by LGBT people in 1979.[6] LGBT History Month is intended to encourage honesty and openness about being LGBT.[10]
In 2011, Equality Forum introduced an internal search engine for all Icons from inception in 2006 to present. By clicking on "Icon Search" and choosing one of hundreds of categories[13] such as African-American, athlete, California, Germany, HIV/AIDS, Military, Religion, Transgender, Youth; visitors to the site will be provided with links to all Icons in that category.[citation needed]
In 1999, Task Force Pride Philippines (TFP), a network of LGBT and LGBT-friendly groups and individuals seeking to promote positive visibility for the LGBT community was born. Since then, TFP has been organizing the annual Metro Manila Pride March. In 2003, a decision was made to move the Pride March from June to the December Human Rights Week to coincide with related human rights activities such as World AIDS Day (December 1), Philippine National Lesbian Day (December 8), and International Human Rights Day (December 10).
In August 2012, the first Ugandan pride parade was held in Entebbe to protest the government's treatment of its LGBT citizens and the attempts by the Ugandan Parliament to adopt harsher sodomy laws, colloquially named the Kill the Gays Bill, which would include life imprisonment for aggravated homosexuality.[45] A second pride parade was held in Entebbe in August 2013.[46] The law was promulgated in December 2013 and subsequently ruled invalid by the Constitutional Court of Uganda on August 1, 2014 on technical grounds. On August 9, 2014, Ugandans held a third pride parade in Entebbe despite indications that the ruling may be appealed and/or the law reintroduced in Parliament and homosexual acts still being illegal in the country.[47]
A number of associations and social movements have been denouncing in recent years which, in its views, is a depletion of the claims of these demonstrations and the merchandization of the parade. In this respect, they defend, in countries like Spain, the United States or Canada, a Critical Pride celebration to have a political meaning again.[63][64][65][66] Gay Shame, a radical movement within the LGBT community, opposes the assimilation of LGBT people into mainstream, heteronormative society, the commodification of non-heterosexual identity and culture, and in particular the (over) commercialization of pride events.[citation needed]
In a special queer issue of The Stranger in 1999, openly gay author, pundit, and journalist Dan Savage questioned the relevance of pride thirty years later, writing that pride was an effective antidote to shame imposed on LGBT people, but that pride is now making LGBT people dull and slow as a group, as well as being a constant reminder of shame. However, he also states that pride in some simpler forms are still useful to individuals struggling with shame. Savage writes that gay pride can also lead to disillusionment where an LGBT individual realises the reality that sexual orientation doesn't say much about a person's personality, after being led by the illusion that LGBT individuals are part of a co-supportive and inherently good group of people.[60]

The Hong Kong Pride Parade 2008 boosted the rally count above 1,000 in the second largest East Asian Pride after Taipei’s. By now a firmly annual event, Pride 2013 saw more than 5,200 participants. The city continues to hold the event every year, except in 2010 when it was not held due to a budget shortfall.[48][49][50][51][52][53][54][excessive citations][non-primary source needed]


Even the most festive parades usually offer some aspect dedicated to remembering victims of AIDS and anti-LGBT violence. Some particularly important pride parades are funded by governments and corporate sponsors and promoted as major tourist attractions for the cities that host them. In some countries, some pride parades are now also called Pride Festivals. Some of these festivals provide a carnival-like atmosphere in a nearby park or city-provided closed-off street, with information booths, music concerts, barbecues, beer stands, contests, sports, and games. The 'dividing line' between onlookers and those marching in the parade can be hard to establish in some events, however, in cases where the event is received with hostility, such a separation becomes very obvious. There have been studies considering how the relationship between participants and onlookers is affected by the divide, and how space is used to critique the heteronormative nature of society.
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